Many Third-Generation Latinos Don't Speak Spanish. They're Tired Of Being Judged For It. (2023)

Many Third-Generation Latinos Don't Speak Spanish. They're Tired Of Being Judged For It. (1)

Illustration: Adrián Astorgano For HuffPost

As a child, Prizzilla Greer often felt caught in the middle of a cultural tug of war because she didn’t speak Spanish.

Growing up in Murrieta and Temecula, wine-producing suburbs about an hour and a half outside of Los Angeles, Spanish seemed nonexistent, she told HuffPost.

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“For the most part, the majority of our peers were white,” Greer said.

But in the confines of her home, Greer received mixed messaging on the importance of being bilingual. Greer was born to a Mexican-American mother and a Mexican father who was granted amnesty during Ronald Reagan’s time in office. While her dad was adamant that she’d only speak English, her maternal grandmother had other ideas.

“Our grandmother, who we call ‘buela,’ short for abuela, wanted us to learn Spanish, and would speak it to us or try to teach us against our dad’s wishes,” she said.

Her mom would have preferred the kids be bilingual, too, but Greer said her dad feared that if they were, or if they had even a hint of a Spanish accent, “they would endure the same kind of abuse from white Americans” as he did as a kid growing up in the states.

Even soccer was off limits for Greer and her siblings: Football was fine, fútbol wasn’t.

“He wanted to avoid all Mexican stereotypes for us, so he’d encourage all-American sports like football or baseball,” said Greer, who’s now 29 and lives in Tacoma, Washington, with her husband and two kids.

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Since then, Greer’s attempts to learn Spanish have come in fits and starts: She tried taking it in high school, but it was Peninsular Spanish (Spanish spoken in Spain) and as a teen, she had trouble seeing the value in that particular dialect.

While stationed in Germany during her time in the U.S. Army, Greer tried Duolingo and Rosetta Stone, but again, it didn’t quite stick. Years later, she still hopes to learn the language once and for all.

“I feel like it’s a chunk of my identity that was missing growing up in a conservative, white space,” she said.

But what’s equally frustrating for Greer is the judgment she receives from others in the Latino American community for her lack of Spanish fluency. The criticism and cattiness is especially common online.

“The judgement has been more in recent years because social media has made it a thing to harass Latinos who don’t speak Spanish,” she said. “Now, I have to tell the world that I’m not white, because apparently now if you’re Mexican-American and don’t speak Spanish, it means you’re white.”

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Many Third-Generation Latinos Don't Speak Spanish. They're Tired Of Being Judged For It. (2)

Courtesy of Prizzilla Greer

(Video) Some Latinos face community criticism over Spanish skills

That’s a familiar Catch-22 for Latinos in the U.S. who grew up in a time before dual-language immersion programs: You’re told to exclusively speak English in order to assimilate and get a better paying job, only to be judged by your community ― and sometimes other family members ― for not being “Latino enough” as a monolingual English speaker. It’s marginalization on top of marginalization.

“That bothers me because my experience growing up hasn’t been that I was a white-passing or white person,” Greer said. “If that was the case, other Mexicans wouldn’t have thought they could speak to me in Spanish. If that was the case, I wouldn’t have been ‘the Mexican friend’ for my white friends. I would’ve just been their friend.”

If that was the case, she thinks her father wouldn’t have felt that outsized fear of his daughter speaking the family’s native tongue.

Because of the desire to assimilate — and in some cases, generational trauma — it’s common for third-generation Latinos to exclusively speak English.

Greer is one of many third generation Latino-Americans who don’t speak Spanish. Recent Pew Research Center studies have found that while about half of second-generation self-identified Latino are bilingual, fewer than a quarter of third generation Latinos speak Spanish.

Others are “receptive bilinguals,” meaning they can understand more of a language than they can speak it.

In spite of the numbers, the “must speak Spanish” litmus test still plagues the third-gen community, said Carmen Fought, a professor of linguistics at Pitzer College and author of “Chicano English in Context,” “Language and Ethnicity,” and “Language and Gender in Children’s Animated Film.”

“When I did my research in East LA, several of the monolingual English speakers that I spoke with said that people teased them about it and said ‘you’re not really Mexican,’ particularly among girls,” Fought said.

“Growing up in the Bay Area, I felt like an imposter, or that I wasn’t ‘Latinx-enough’ to speak a language. I was intimidated, and still am, about my English accent.”

- Robin D.López, a Mexican-American ecologist who lives in Albany, California

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At school and at home, “English-only” may be drilled into you but eventually, the gatekeeping comes from outside, too. That’s especially true in the workforce, according to Laura K. Muñoz, an assistant professor of history and ethnic studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

“Gatekeeping often comes from employers who expect every Latinx to be fluent English and Spanish speakers, which is ironic given the history of English-only and Americanization in our public schools,” the professor told HuffPost.

English-only proponents ― and some native Spanish-speaking parents ― worry that concurrently learning two languages will hinder kids’ English language acquisition. Research suggests otherwise, though; one 2019 University of Washington study suggested that exposure to multiple languages may make it easier to learn one.

For other parents, discouraging their kids from speaking Spanish is a by-product of having been punished for speaking the language in school. If you hear, “This is America, we speak English here” enough times, you’re bound to take the scolding to heart and pass it down to successive generations.

“There were even ‘Spanish detention slips’ in Los Angeles schools for a long time,” Fought said. “I just had a teacher tell me it still happens sometimes. They just call it something different like ‘disturbing the other students by speaking in class.’”

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This issue became a minor news item in the 2020 Democratic Party presidential primaries, when candidate and third-generation Mexican-American Julián Castro was pressed on why he didn’t speak Spanish ― especially while a white guy like fellow candidate Beto O’Rourke did.

While his grandma encouraged bilingualism, his parents feared their kids would be penalized for speaking Spanish in class just like they were, he explained.

Julian Castro is practicing his Spanish, and tells @kasie why he didn't grow up speaking the language: "In my grandparents' time... Spanish was looked down upon. You were not allowed to speak it. People, I think, internalized this oppression..." pic.twitter.com/MLJHq1jCKU

(Video) They'll Never Catch Us

— Way Too Early with Jonathan Lemire (@WayTooEarly) July 1, 2019

As his brother, Texas congressman Joaquin Castro, said last year in an interview with KSAT-TV, “it really is just a generation of people who had a language literally beaten out of them in our school system.”

“It’s so tragic and unfortunate because it was not only the loss of a language, but also partly the loss of a culture,” he added.

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The Castro brothers’ story was deeply felt by many. Ultimately, “[their] monoglot experience is just as authentic — and even more uniquely American,” Mexican-American essayist John Paul Brammer wrote in The Washington Post during the election.

Robin D. López, a Mexican-American ecologist who lives in Albany, California, is sure his family’s Spanish language abandonment is a result of generational trauma and the drive to assimilate as quickly and seamlessly as possible. (In López’s family, only his grandparents natively speak Spanish.)

His grandpa could never forget his uncle Antonio, an immigrant who was killed trying to start a new life in Riverbank, California, in the 1940s.

“He was a Mexican who dared dream of building generational wealth for his family,” López said. “His body was left blocks away from the family home in the Stanislaus River in 1945.”

“My grandfather was still just a child at the time,” he added. “I’d imagine that experience played a significant role in ensuring his descendants assimilated for survival.”

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When it came to López knowing and learning Spanish, lack of exposure wasn’t an issue. He was raised in Richmond, California, and spent much of his youth working in Oakland communities with high populations of displaced people from Latin America as well as first generation folks who grew up speaking Spanish.

By the time he got up the nerve to learn Spanish on his own, López told HuffPost he’d already internalized that he was inadequate. Just imagining stumbling over a language he felt like he “should” be well-versed in from the get-go left him deeply self-conscious.

“Growing up in the Bay Area, I felt like an imposter, or that I wasn’t ‘Latinx-enough’ to speak a language,” he said. “I was intimidated, and still am, about my English accent.”

“Everyone usually spoke Spanish around me, but I also had a negative stereotype projected onto me,” he said. “I had the idea embedded into me that speaking Spanish could be weaponized against me, since our grandparents, particularly my mother’s father, have witnessed and experienced the abuse towards Spanish-speaking families.”

López’s dad eventually taught himself Spanish, but given his schedule working multiple jobs to provide for the family, he didn’t have much time to teach his kids. López, who has since learned Spanish himself enough to carry a conversation, doesn’t hold any of that against his dad.

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“My dad does have regrets about not being able to teach his kids, but that’s not a fault or burden he should carry,” he said. “Not teaching the following generations Spanish was more or less a survival mechanism for our elders, to protect us.”

Many Third-Generation Latinos Don't Speak Spanish. They're Tired Of Being Judged For It. (3)

Courtesy of Robin D. López

Fought, the linguistics professor, noted the inherent racism involved in discouraging speaking Spanish in the classroom.

“Imagine the difference between parents who speak Spanish or Cantonese and parents who speak French and come from Paris,” she said.

In the first case, “everyone worries that the kid won’t learn English and if they speak the other language at school, they may get teased or bullied,” Fought said. “They may be embarrassed to hear their parents speak it around their friends.”

(Video) The Bible Is Full Of Latinos. Dennis Gaxiola

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In the latter case, Fought said everyone would be saying, “Oh, your mom is French, that’s so cool; it’s such a beautiful language.”

In some cases, the judgement over spotty Spanish-speaking comes from within a family.

Marisa Martín, a 26-year-old who lives in California’s Central Valley, is half Mexican and half German. Her dad, the Mexican half of the parental equation, speaks fluent Spanish and her mom is conversational in Spanish.

Growing up, Martín’s grandma babysat and tried to instill Spanish in her, but Martín rejected the lessons with all the stubbornness and defiance you’d expect of a toddler.

“I regret not learning then so much,” she told HuffPost. “I can understand and speak some Spanish, but it’s nowhere close to fluent.”

Because of that ― and because she’s part white ― Martín often feels like she has imposter syndrome within her own family, who talk a mile a minute and by and large don’t repeat themselves for Martín’s benefit.

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“Some of my family is very loving and accepting, but others are not and have certainly made it known that they feel I’m not as Mexican as they are,” she said.

“The latter group will even go so far as to speak complicated sentences in Spanish directly to me in order to humiliate me because they know I don’t understand them,” she explained. “Keep in mind, my entire Mexican family speaks English fluently and has no need to speak to me in Spanish.”

Looking at the Pew stats, Martín is heartened to know that there are other third-gen Mexican-American in a “similar linguistic boat as me.”

Many Third-Generation Latinos Don't Speak Spanish. They're Tired Of Being Judged For It. (4)

Courtesy of Marisa Martín

Still, it saddens her to think how their stories are often discounted, swept under the table or unfairly judged.

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“I’m fortunate to live in California where there are an abundance of Mexicans and Hispanics, but I know in many other parts of the U.S. and world, people have a preconceived notion of what a Mexican should look and sound like,” she said.

When someone feels ― or is made to feel inferior― about the language(s) they speak (or don’t speak) and the way that they speak them, it’s what linguists describe as “linguistic insecurity.”

“‘Speaking Spanish’ is a moving target for immigrants’ children, who are criticized by their own families and communities for not sounding ‘like a native speaker,’ regardless of how well they do speak and understand Spanish, and how this leads to anxiety, linguistic insecurity and a questioning of identity,” said Amelia Tseng, an assistant professor of linguistics and Spanish at American University in Washington, D.C.

“Unfortunately, heritage speakers often receive criticism of their language abilities from all sides, which they internalize as a personal failing,” she said.

Ultimately, language is only one aspect of cultural identity.

Each third-gen person we spoke to for this article wants to learn or is in the process of learning Spanish. López wants to learn mostly because when his grandfather was dying, it crushed him to know how much he’d never know about the patriarch’s life and memories all because of a language barrier.

(Video) Struggles of Not Feeling Latino Enough

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But each person we spoke to also has complicated feelings about the in-community pressure to pass a Spanish test in order to be considered Latino.

López, for instance, knows that his work within the Latinx community is worth more than using the right preposition in Spanish and remembering that it’s “gracias por…” not “gracias par.”

“In spite of the language barriers at times, I’ve worked hard in advocacy spaces and with grass-root organizations to protect our vulnerable community members in my hometown of Richmond, California,” he said. “I’ve also done photography gigs as a local freelance photographer to highlight the beauty of our culture and the ways in which we celebrate our intersectionality of existence.”

Most recently, he decided to run for local elected office for Albany City Council. López said he hopes to champion progressive policies, while also serving to represent the growing Latinx population in the area.

“Not speaking Spanish has its challenges, but it doesn’t prevent a person from representing our culture and people,” he said.

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“The fact that we continue to embrace ourselves as Latinxs is what really matters, whether we speak Spanish, English, or both.”

- Laura K. Muñoz,an assistant professor of history and ethnic studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Greer hopes that people who blame third-generation Latinos for not speaking their parent’s language will try to see the nuance involved in situations like theirs.

“It wasn’t our choice,” she said. “Everyone says you can always learn, but it’s extremely difficult to learn another language after those early years of childhood, and some of us have learning disabilities or ADHD, like myself.”

Plus, she said, “if we’re really going to go there, Spanish isn’t even our language, it’s the language of our Spanish colonizers.”

Ultimately, language is only one aspect of cultural identity, said Muñoz, the ethnic studies professor.

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“If we choose not to teach our children Spanish, but teach them everything else that we believe is relevant, then that’s what matters,” she said. “We get to decide what counts.”

American historian Vicki Ruiz has written that Chicano immigrants and their children “pick, borrow and retain” elements of their home culture. Muñoz looks at today’s third-gen Latino Americans and sees them doing the exact same thing.

“In a society that has proactively attempted to quash our language and our Latinidad, the fact that we continue to embrace ourselves as Latinxs is what really matters, whether we speak Spanish, English, or both,” she said.

FAQs

What do you call a Hispanic that doesn't speak Spanish? ›

Pocho (feminine: pocha) is slang in Spanish used in Mexico to refer to Mexican Americans and Mexican emigrants. It is often used pejoratively to describe a Mexican expatriate or a person of Mexican ancestry who lacks fluency or the ability to speak in Spanish and knowledge of Mexican culture.

What is a third generation Mexican? ›

Third or higher generation Latinos were born in the U.S. to U.S.-born parents, and these findings show that for this group, their ties to their U.S. national identity are strong. Another measure of identity is how much Hispanics feel a common identity with other Americans.

Do all Chicanos speak Spanish? ›

Many Latinos consider Chicanos who don't speak Spanish “gringos,” or “white-washed.” That is far from the truth. I know many Chicanos who feel ashamed of not being able to speak the language and are making efforts to learn — not to mention studying and embracing the culture and history of our people.

What percentage of Latinos are bilingual? ›

Among those who speak English, 59 percent are bilingual. 50 percent of children of immigrant parents are bilingual, compared to 35 percent of Latino immigrants, and 23 percent of Latinos with U.S. born parents. 42 percent of Latinos ages 18 to 29 are bilingual.

Is it OK to say Latino? ›

When talking about people of Latin American descent in the U.S. you can generally use Latino (or Latina for a woman). Hispanic is also correct if you are talking to someone who speaks Spanish.

What do you call people who only speak Spanish? ›

A person who speaks Spanish is Hispanic. A person who is from Spain or has origins from Spain is Spanish.

What is 3rd generation ethnicity? ›

Persons in the third generation are those who have both U.S.-born parents, but one or more foreign-born grandparents. For these persons ethnicity is primarily determined by the maternal grandmother's country of birth.

What is the DNA of a Mexican? ›

The farther away ethnic groups live from each other, the more different their genomes turn out to be. But most people in Mexico or of Mexican descent these days are not indigenous but rather mestizo, meaning they have a mixture of indigenous, European, and African ancestry.

What are the 3 types of Mexicans? ›

Ethnic groups
  • Mestizo Mexicans.
  • White Mexicans.
  • Indigenous Mexicans.
  • Other Ethno-Cultural communities.

What race speaks Spanish the most? ›

Mexico has the most speakers with 110 million. Colombia is second in line. The USA is tied with Argentina at about 41 million. Next, comes Venezuela, Peru, Chile, Ecuador, Guatemala and Cuba.

What percentage of Mexican DNA is Spanish? ›

A Mexico City autosomal ancestry study found that the European ancestry of Mexicans was 52 percent; the remainder was primarily Amerindian, with a small African contribution.

Do Mexicans still speak Aztec? ›

Varieties of Nahuatl are spoken by about 1.7 million Nahua peoples, most of whom live mainly in Central Mexico and have smaller populations in the United States.
...
Nahuatl
Native speakers1.7 million in Mexico (2020 census)
Language familyUto-Aztecan Southern Uto-Aztecan Nahuan Nahuatl
Early formProto-Nahuan
17 more rows

Do bilinguals have higher IQ? ›

Bilingual children who speak native language at home have higher intelligence. Children who regularly use their native language at home while growing up in a different country have higher IQs, a new study has shown.

What happens to your brain when you are bilingual? ›

Bilingual people show increased activation in the brain region associated with cognitive skills like attention and inhibition. For example, bilinguals are proven to be better than monolinguals in encoding the fundamental frequency of sounds in the presence of background noise.

Are bilinguals less likely to get dementia? ›

Bilingualism is one form of cognitive stimulation that requires multiple aspects of brain activity and has been shown to delay the onset of dementia symptoms in patients by approximately 4–5 years as compared with monolingual patients through cognitive reserve.

What is considered rude in Hispanic culture? ›

Mexicans often "hold" a gesture (a handshake, a squeeze of the arm, a hug) longer than Americans and Canadians do. Don't stand with your hands on your hips; this signifies anger. It is considered rude to stand around with your hands in your pockets.

Are Italians Latinos? ›

Among these Romance languages are Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, and Rumanian. Therefore, all Italians, Frenchmen, Spaniards, Rumanians, and Portuguese, as well as all those Latin Americans whose language is Spanish or Portuguese (an English-speaking person from Jamaica would not qualify) are latinos.

Why do they ask if you are Hispanic? ›

We ask a question about whether a person is of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin to create statistics about this ethnic group. Local, state, tribal, and federal programs use these data, and they are critical factors in the basic research behind numerous policies, particularly for civil rights.

Who speaks the purest Spanish? ›

If you're looking to learn the purest Spanish, Mexico is the place to go. It has all the grammar conventions from the Spaniards, but with the clear enunciation of indigenous languages.

Will Spanish overtake English in America? ›

In conclusion, though Spanish is not very likely to overtake English as the main language in America, it is clear that the influx of immigrants will help the language keep a strong presence as a second language all across the country.

Is it rude to speak Spanish at work? ›

Here's what he had to say: “In general, it is considered inappropriate and unprofessional to speak a foreign language in the presence of coworkers who do not understand. Many organizations have policies requiring that only English is spoken during meetings or when conducting business.

What is the characteristic of third generation? ›

Answer. The features were: reliability, lesser production of heat, low maintenance, reduction in size, less consumption of power, high-level language was used, use of integrated circuits, faster, more efficient multiprogramming OS was supported. Answer. Languages used were PASCAL, FORTRAN, COBOL, etc.

What are the features of 3rd generation? ›

Techopedia Explains Third Generation Computers
  • Integrated circuits instead of individual transistors.
  • Smaller, cheaper, more efficient and faster than second generation computers.
  • High-level programming languages.
  • Magnetic storage.

How many generations does it take to lose a language? ›

Over the next three generations, the number of speakers declines sharply as this last fluent generation become parents, grandparents, and finally, the last generation of fluent elders. As those elders die, the doomed language becomes dormant or extinct.

What is my ethnicity if I am Mexican but born in America? ›

Chicano – Includes people born in the United States with Mexican ancestry. States. Many Latinos have come from Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Cuba and/or South America.

What are native Mexican called? ›

Indigenous peoples of Mexico (Spanish: gente indígena de México, pueblos indígenas de México), Native Mexicans (Spanish: nativos mexicanos) or Mexican Native Americans (Spanish: pueblos originarios de México, lit.

What is the most common Mexican male name? ›

1. Daniel. Originally from Hebrew, this name means “God is my judge.” It's a powerful and traditional name that's not only the most popular Mexican boy name but is also a popular name in many other places and cultures. In Mexico, it's usually pronounced dah-nyehl.

Why do Mexicans have 3 names? ›

Mexicans have a personal name(s) followed by two surnames – the father's paternal family name and then the mother's paternal family name. For example: Hector Marίa GONZALEZ LÓPEZ.

What are the 3 colors of the Mexican? ›

This design may have been influenced by the French Tricolor, but the colours were distinctively Mexican. Green symbolizes independence, white is for the Roman Catholic religion, and red is for union—the “Three Guarantees” of Iguala.

What race is majority Mexico? ›

The majority of the country is mestizo, but students of color may face slight discrimination. Apart from mestizos and Amerindians, there are not many other ethnic groups in Mexico.

Who speaks faster English or Spanish? ›

Spanish is in second place with around 8-9 syllables spoken per second, whereas, English is in eight place with around 6-7 syllables spoken per second. In other words, Spanish native speakers speak 25% more quickly than English native speakers.

Who speaks faster Spanish or Italian? ›

One 2011 study from the Université de Lyon looked at 7 languages, which reported the order as Japanese (7.84 syllables per second), Spanish (7.82), French (7.18), Italian (6.99), English (6.19), German (5.97) and Mandarin (5.18).

Why do people in Spain talk so fast? ›

A Spanish speaker would almost always link the vowel sounds and pronounce the whole thing as a single word: Todoestoestaquí (To-does-toes-ta-quí). This is another factor that makes Spanish seem faster than English.

What DNA do Spanish people have? ›

Like other Western Europeans, among Spaniards and Portuguese the Y-DNA Haplogroup R1b is the most frequent, occurring at over 70% throughout most of Spain. R1b is particularly dominant in the Basque Country and Catalonia, occurring at rate of over 80%.

What percentage of Mexican DNA is Native American? ›

For mtDNA variation, some studies have measured Native American, European and African contributions to Mexican and Mexican American populations, revealing 85 to 90% of mtDNA lineages are of Native American origin [53,54], with the remainder having European (5-7%) or African ancestry (3-5%) [54].

How do I know if I have Spanish blood? ›

The easiest way to find out if you have inherited Spanish DNA from your ancestors would be to take an autosomal DNA test. This type of DNA test is offered by several different companies, but I recommend using Ancestry DNA. What is this? I recommend testing with 23andMe or Ancestry DNA.

What did Mexicans speak before Spanish? ›

Nahuatl language, Spanish náhuatl, Nahuatl also spelled Nawatl, also called Aztec, American Indian language of the Uto-Aztecan family, spoken in central and western Mexico. Nahuatl, the most important of the Uto-Aztecan languages, was the language of the Aztec and Toltec civilizations of Mexico.

What language did Mayans speak? ›

Yucatec language, also called Maya or Yucatec Maya, American Indian language of the Mayan family, spoken in the Yucatán Peninsula, including not only part of Mexico but also Belize and northern Guatemala.

Is Maya still spoken? ›

Yucatec Maya (known simply as "Maya" to its speakers) is the most commonly spoken Mayan language in Mexico. It is currently spoken by approximately 800,000 people, the vast majority of whom are to be found on the Yucatán Peninsula. It remains common in Yucatán and in the adjacent states of Quintana Roo and Campeche.

What country has the smallest IQ? ›

These factors contribute to the nation of Nepal having the lowest IQ of all nations in the world, coming in at an average of 42.99. The average global IQ is 82.03, so Nepal ranks far below the average intelligence level measured worldwide.

Which culture has the highest IQ? ›

Ranked: The 25 Smartest Countries In The World
RankingCountryAverage IQ
1Singapore107.1
2China105.8
3Hong Kong105.7
4South Korea104.6
21 more rows
11 Jan 2019

Which country has the highest level of IQ? ›

Intelligence related to income and climate
RankCountryIQ
1Hong Kong *108
2Singapore108
3South Korea106
4Taiwan *106
92 more rows

What is the easiest language to learn? ›

15 of the easiest languages to learn for English speakers - ranked
  • Frisian. Frisian is thought to be one of the languages most closely related to English, and therefore also the easiest for English-speakers to pick up. ...
  • Dutch. ...
  • Norwegian. ...
  • Spanish. ...
  • Portuguese. ...
  • Italian. ...
  • French. ...
  • Swedish.
24 Oct 2021

Does learning language increase IQ? ›

Learning another language is one of the most effective and practical ways to increase intelligence, keep your mind sharp, and buffer your brain against aging.

What is the hardest language to learn? ›

Across multiple sources, Mandarin Chinese is the number one language listed as the most challenging to learn. The Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center puts Mandarin in Category IV, which is the list of the most difficult languages to learn for English speakers.

What race is dementia most common in? ›

Studies examining racial and ethnic disparities in dementia incidence in the US have consistently reported higher rates of dementia for Black adults. Hispanic older adults are less well studied but also have greater dementia incidence than have White older adults.

What race is more likely to develop dementia? ›

Previous studies have shown that for the overall U.S. population, Black Americans are roughly 1.5 to 2 times as likely than whites to develop Alzheimer's and related dementias.

Which country has the lowest incidence of dementia? ›

New research shows some of the lowest rates of dementia in the world are found in Bolivia.

Does neutral Spanish exist? ›

Neutral Spanish doesn't really exist. However, in an attempt to produce a neutral Spanish, a professional translator who understands the different dialects between the differing regions will choose the words that are most recognizable to the greatest number of Spanish readers living in that area.

What can I use instead of Hispanic? ›

The term Latino began to replace the term Hispanic across the United States. Latino typically refers to a person with Latin American ancestry, regardless of their language of origin, and excludes people from Spain. The letter "o" in Latino was used to represent male and female individuals as a group of people.

What is the difference between Hispanic Spanish and Latinx? ›

Here are some general rules of thumb: "Hispanic" means a person who speaks Spanish. "Latino," "Latina," or the newer "Latinx" means a person of Latin American descent. "Spanish" means a person from Spain or who has origin from Spain.

Why is Castellano not Spanish? ›

Spanish is sometimes known as Castilian because the language emerged from Latin in the Castile area of Spain. In some Spanish-speaking areas, the language is called castellano rather than or in addition to español.

What accent is the most neutral? ›

The idea that there is one accent that is the most neutrally American has been around for a long time, and it is usually called “General American.” The term was coined in 1925 by the descriptive linguist George Philip Krapp as a way to describe the accent he thought was becoming the norm in the United States.

What is the most Neutral Spanish accent? ›

These dialects are often considered easier to understand, and the Colombian accent has been called the “most neutral Spanish accent.” That's because in this region, people speak Spanish more slowly and don't cut words.

Is there pure Spanish? ›

There is not a pure variety of Spanish, but it is interesting to examine why this question exists. First of all, the Iberian Peninsula itself is at the center of this debate. In this part of the world we can find several accents.

What is a female Hispanic called? ›

In the United States the terms "Hispanic" and "Latino" (or "Latina" for a woman; sometimes written as “Latinx” to be gender-neutral) were adopted in an attempt to loosely group immigrants and their descendants who hail from this part of the world.

What is my race if I am Hispanic born in America? ›

People who identify themselves as Spanish, Hispanic or Latino may be of any race. Hispanic or Latino refers to people whose ancestors or descendants originated in Central and South America and in the Caribbean, who follow the customs and cultures of these areas and who may speak Spanish.

Why do they ask if you are Hispanic or non Hispanic? ›

We ask a question about whether a person is of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin to create statistics about this ethnic group. Local, state, tribal, and federal programs use these data, and they are critical factors in the basic research behind numerous policies, particularly for civil rights.

Do Latinos like the term Latinx? ›

According to the Pew Research Center, a thimble-sized portion of people with Latin American ancestry use the term Latinx. In August 2020, the center reported that 3 percent of respondents viewed it favorably; a year later, a Gallup poll increased that to 4 percent.

Why do people call Latinos Latinx? ›

Latinx is a neologism in American English which is used to refer to people of Latin American cultural or ethnic identity in the United States. The gender-neutral ⟨-x⟩ suffix replaces the ⟨-o/-a⟩ ending of Latino and Latina that are typical of grammatical gender in Spanish. Its plural is Latinxs.

What do Mexicans call Spanish? ›

The Spanish language spoken in Spain is called Castilian Spanish. In fact, it is considered the official Spanish language, which you will most commonly hear spoken in northern and central Spain. Now, what language does Mexico speak? This style of Spanish is referred to as Latin American Spanish or Mexican Spanish.

What do Spanish people call Spain? ›

The term Spain (España in Spanish) is derived from the Roman name for the region: Hispania.

Who speaks proper Spanish? ›

Spanish is the (or an) official language of 18 American countries (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, and Venezuela) as well as of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, along with Spain in ...

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